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Son of a Son of a Sailor
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195 Posts
Catalytic converter

You wouldn't happen to have a photo of the converter opened up would you. I am thinking of opening the stock cat, gutting it and closing it up. Just wanted to see what I was getting into.
 

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It aint no good locking the doors, when the madnes
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7,305 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
You wouldn't happen to have a photo of the converter opened up would you. I am thinking of opening the stock cat, gutting it and closing it up. Just wanted to see what I was getting into.
Hi mate, its Midas, i get to use my real name over here :D
As you know I didnt actually open it up, i just cut it out and replaced it with two stainless.

What i will do today is try and dig it out and take a couple of pics if i still have it.

 

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Son of a Son of a Sailor
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195 Posts
Cat

I've seen pics of your conversion, just thought you might be the inquizitive type and opened up the cat for a look see. My plan is to remove the guts from the cat and use it as a balance chamber of sorts.
 

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It aint no good locking the doors, when the madnes
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7,305 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
I didnt open it up because i could see enough looking through from one end to the other.
Why dont you just get in there and clear it out?
 

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Registered
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20 Posts
Thanks for doing this,

This is invaluable to folks who need to know what stuff looks like and how it all fits before they tear into it. Thanks Again !

Slick.....:scooter:
 

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Premium Member
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4,478 Posts
It's surprising how often I've referred to this thread when I'm working on something. It's pretty useful, thanks Scots!
 

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It aint no good locking the doors, when the madnes
Joined
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7,305 Posts
Discussion Starter #15
The bike had 34 miles on the clock when i took those pics, i rode it straight home and pulled stuff off to see what was what.
 

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It aint no good locking the doors, when the madnes
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7,305 Posts
Discussion Starter #19
XR oil system...........

1. Oil is gravity-fed from the oil tank to the gerotor-style oil
pump through a feed hose and internal passages. Oil
enters the inlet cavity of the feed pump.

2. The feed pump transfers oil through a passage in the
pump housing to a point where it splits direction.The pump
is capable of delivering more oil than can flow through the
engine. When oil pressure exceeds approximately 50 psi
(345 kPa), the bypass valve will open allowing oil to circulate
back into the inlet side of the feed pump.

3. Part of the oil passes through an internal passage toward
the oil filter and part heads toward the oil cooler line.

4. Oil flowing toward the oil cooler exits the oil pump housing
through a line that is connected via a quick connect fitting
at each end, and enters the lower end of the oil cooler. Oil
flows up through the oil cooler and exits the upper end
where it flows back to the oil pump housing.

5. A thermostat is located where the oil cooler return line
connects to the oil pump housing. No oil from the oil cooler
will flow past the thermostat until the engine oil temperature
reaches 190°F (88°C). Once the thermostat begins
to open, oil from the oil cooler flows past it while oil flow
directly from the feed pump is restricted, providing cooled
oil for engine lubrication. When the thermostat reaches
full open position, a seal on the end seals off oil flow directly
from the pump and all oils passes through the oil
cooler, past the thermostat, and towards the oil filter.

6. Oil flowing to the filter passes through an internal passage
to the oil filter mount.

7. Oil flows through the filter mount cavity to the oil filter.

8. Oil enters the peripheral cavity of the oil filter, passes
through the filtering medium into the central cavity of the
oil filter, and flows into the filter adapter (fitting which
attaches the filter to filter mount).

9. Adequate oil pressure in the filter supply passage activates
the oil pressure indicator lamp switch and shuts off the
oil pressure indicator lamp.

10. Oil flowing from the filter adapter opens the check ball.
The check ball opens at 5-7 psi (34-48 kPa) oil pressure.

11. With the check ball open, oil flows into the crankcase
feed galley.

12. Oil flows through the feed galley in the crankcase to the
tappet blocks and hydraulic lifters. Cross-drilled passages
intersect the main feed galley and carry oil to each
hydraulic lifter. From this cavity, oil is also fed to the piston
jets.

13. Also from the feed galley in the crankcase, oil flows
through a cross drilled passage to the check valve
assembly and to the cylinder heads through flexible lines.
Oil across the cylinder heads and through passages that
surround the exhaust ports. Oil exits each cylinder head
near the exhaust port.

14. Oil exiting the heads flows to the return oil manifold
where it is mixed with the scavenge oil from the scavenge
pump and is pushed back to the tank.

15. Also from the feed galley in the crankcase, oil enters an
intersecting passage in the oil pump body and cam
support. Oil flow is then routed to the outer bearing of
the rear intake camshaft. A cast-in passage allows oil into
a cavity that surrounds the end of the pinion gear shaft.

16. From the same cavity near the end of the pinion shaft, oil
enters the center hole in the oil pump rotor cover which
intersects with a passage that carries oil to the outer
bearings of the front intake camshaft and rear exhaust
camshaft and is used to lubricate the cam bearings.

17. The outer bearing of the front exhaust camshaft is lubricated
through a drilled passage that intersects with the
feed galley.

18. Crankcase end of bearings of the cams are fed through
holes in the camshaft.

19. A small amount of oil flows from the feed galley in the right
crankcase through a restricted orifice, which sprays the
oil onto the rear intake cam gear in the gearcase. Oil is
transferred to the teeth of all the cam gears through the
gear meshing action.

20. Oil enters a hole in the end of the pinion gear shaft and
travels to the right flywheel where it is routed through the
flywheel to the crank pin. Oil is forced through the crank
pin to properly lubricate the rod bearing assembly.

21. Oil flows up passages in the push rods to the rocker arm
shafts and bushings.

22. The valve stems are lubricated by oil supplied through
drilled oil holes in the rocker arms.

23. Oil collected in the push rod areas of the cylinder heads
flows down the push rod covers, through drain holes in
the tappet blocks and into the gearcase. After providing
lubrication to the gearcase components the oil settles to
the bottom of the gearcase where the scavenge pump will
collect it.

24. Feed oil to the rocker area is returned to the gearcase
through a passage in the cylinder head, cylinder, and
crankcase.

25. Oil collected in the sump is splash-fed to the pistons, cylinder
walls and flywheel components.

26. Oil collected in the sump area returns to the scavenge
pump through an internal passage located in the rear
section of the sump housing. Oil flow to the pump is
accomplished by the scavenging effect of the pump and
by the pressure created by the downward stroke of the
pistons.

27. Oil collected in the gearcase passes through a passage
in the oil pump body and cam support and is also collected
by the scavenge pump.

28. The scavenge pump pushes the collected oil back to the
oil tank.

29. Crankcase vents to oil tank.
 
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