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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey guys,

I wish my first post could be better, but today when I was pulling out of the gym in the parking lot, about 8 mph, I put on the breaks to slow while making a left and my front breaks seized. My front tire slid out from under the bike to the right and I did a face plant on the left side. The ground smashed the sun visor off my head. My left ankle is a little sore, my left knee has a silver dollar sized raspberry, but I'm ok. All I can think of is the bike is so new, only 70 miles, that the breaks are sticky. The shifter foot peg broke off and bent into the engine. The handlebars bent on the left side and my sport windscreen is scuffed. I went back into the gym and borrowed a wrench to pry the foot shifter away from the body to be far enough away to shift gears to get her home. It’s only 1 ½ miles to my house so I made it. Anyway, I'll report this to Progressive and see what they say. Anybody else hear of this or have this problem?
 
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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
rule number 1 of breaking with the handlebars turned..... use the rear brake not the front! that sucks that you wiped out!
 

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Back in Black
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72 Posts
After my little mishap earlier this week, you have my sympathies. Roadglidejj is right though, keep off that front brake in such low speed situations. The front brake is touchy, and never needs more than one finger pulling the lever. I'd prefer a good bit more effort required to make the front brake work. You have to remember to just barely breathe on it, but you have to pull like a longshoreman on the clutch lever. It is difficult to consistently apply asymmetric forces like that. I believe the effort should be more balanced.

This isn't a break in or adjustment issue though, they're all like this.
 
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
So true, i also had a little slide when i picked it up at the dealer (the first time that is), had the hanldebars turned to the right and put the brakes on slightly. Luckely i could manage to keep the bike upright but i am sure this is only thanks to the speed i had at that moment. (about 2 mph)

Anyway, welcome to the forum and i hope that the damage is not to bad. Luckely you are prettymuch ok.

greetz Stef
 
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Welcome Midnight. Sorry about your incident. Be prepared to hear from a French attorney working an angle on the brakes...
 

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Scooter Trash
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194 Posts
Welcome aboard 12midnight. Sorry to hear about your mishap but good to hear you're O.K. Bike parts are easy to replace. Good luck in the future.
 

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je sui le attorne por a victim of Harley malfeasance and defective accidente de la brakes. Please send detaile & photographia ala accidente and join me on moi quest to pilfer evil US corporate giant. I too, have experience and nearly scratch my knee. We sue together, yes?
 

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Back in Black
Joined
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72 Posts
je sui le attorne por a victim of Harley malfeasance and defective accidente de la brakes. Please send detaile & photographia ala accidente and join me on moi quest to pilfer evil US corporate giant. I too, have experience and nearly scratch my knee. We sue together, yes?
I don't care what anyone says, that there Frenchie is funny. :D
 
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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Thanks man,

I was wondering what I did wrong. I will for sure hit the back breaks when slow turning. I was really concerned about this but now I feel better.

A note to Frenchy: If I hired an attorney every time I did something stupid, I'd be a million in debt and have a lot of folks pissed at me. Take ownership of your blunders.
 
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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Also, should I pretty much just use the front breaks when pointed straight ahead and the back breaks when cornering? Is that the golden rule for the most part?
 

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Back in Black
Joined
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72 Posts
Also, should I pretty much just use the front breaks when pointed straight ahead and the back breaks when cornering? Is that the golden rule for the most part?
No. At least 70% of your stopping power is due to the front brakes. That's because when you are trying to stop weight shifts forward causing the front tire to do most of the work. It is really important to learn to coordinate braking. Otherwise your stopping distances are going to be way long, and you're going to hit someone or something.

The trick you have to learn is how hard to brake under different conditions. In a straight line, you can lay into the brakes pretty hard before turning it into a skid. In a turn you have to go easier, especially with the front, because the tires have to turn the bike as well as slow it, and that robs the tires of some braking ability. If you brake too hard in a turn, you'll skid and likely fall, as you've already experienced.

Speed plays a big factor too. To skid, the tire has to go much slower than the bike. If you're going 60 MPH, it is going to take a lot of braking to overcome inertia and bring the tire to a skid. If you're going 6 MPH, it won't take much at all. So you have to educate your right hand to stay out of the skid zone by braking much lighter at low speeds.

Locking up the rear at low speed isn't as likely to dump you, so you can lay into the rear brake a lot more than the front. But understand that in a quick stop, the rear is going to be awfully light because of weight transfer, so it will be easier to make skid too.

Some late model Japanese bikes have anti-lock brake systems like a car. This can help keep you out of trouble. But most bikes don't have this yet, so you've got to master the art of braking manually.
 
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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Thanks man,

I was wondering what I did wrong. I will for sure hit the back breaks when slow turning. I was really concerned about this but now I feel better.

A note to Frenchy: If I hired an attorney every time I did something stupid, I'd be a million in debt and have a lot of folks pissed at me. Take ownership of your blunders.
You had a bit of a touchie forum start based on your first post, cause of experience with another fellow who was just out to sue. Don't pay Cybr no nevermind. He's joshin ya. Others of us have gone down for various reasons on the bike(s). Under light conditions like you did it, it can be a valuable learning experience to keep you safe at speed. Welcome to the forum, post up with a self intro, and glad you are ok.
 

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Warning! Fat people are harder to kidnap.
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1,373 Posts
One reason for your fall may be due to the sudden "hit" you feel when the brakes are first applied. With only 70 miles on the bike the tire was green and you grabbed the brake too hard and gravity took over. Go easy on the front brake till you are used to the feel. :D Later,
 
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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
The front brakes work better on the XR than on any other bike that I have owned/ridden before= overly easy to opperate. I nearly pooped myself once, healed way over/ goin to fast in a corner, grabbed the brake a little hard and thought I was goin to lose it.
Now I leave my index finger wraped around the grip and only use the other 3 fingers to apply the brakes. This has helped me to regulate pressure from my hand and I haven't had this problem again.
After getting used to the XRs brakes, the brakes on all my other bikes feel weak and wimpy. Now I find myself under braking initially on them.

Glad to read that you are fine and welcome :)
 

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Warning! Fat people are harder to kidnap.
Joined
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1,373 Posts
Get rid of the big "hit" when you first apply the brakes and do away with the heat fade as well with the XR1200X floating rotors. I think the part number is 54530-10. These are also lighter and make the bike easier to flick into turns and do not fade. :D Later,
 

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Now I leave my index finger wraped around the grip and only use the other 3 fingers to apply the brakes. :)
Funny how it varies for different riders.....I do exactly the opposite of what you do. Index finger on the lever and the others on the grip.
 

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Registered
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41 Posts
12Midnight, ouch sorry that your first post had to be because of a dump. Lots of good info already offered up here.

The only thing I would add is that if you haven't already, take a MSF class. You will be amazed at what you'll learn, proper braking was the biggest lesson for me and I'd been riding 39 years before my last class!

Take care and hope you get the bike squared away quickly.
 
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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
I would recommend that you read a book called " Proficient Motorcycling" I can't recall the author off hand but the book is full of useful info for any rider especially someone just starting out
 
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